Notice: Intensive course on the Yogasūtra, Summer 2020

From Elizabeth De Michelis: Dear Colleagues, AMRAY, of which I am one of the managers, would like to advertise to suitable candidates an intensive course on the Yogasūtra that will take place in France this Summer (mid-June to mid-August 2020). The Continue reading Notice: Intensive course on the Yogasūtra, Summer 2020

Book Announcement — Hinduism: A Contemporary Philosophical Investigation

Dear Indian Philosophy Bloggers and Readers I would like to share with you news of my in-press book. It is scheduled to be out in July, which is late to be considered for September teaching and research, so I thought Continue reading Book Announcement — Hinduism: A Contemporary Philosophical Investigation

The Center for Buddhist Studies Department of Philosophy, University of Mumbai Organizes an International Conference On Buddhist Phenomenology, Culture and Society Between February, 15th, 16th and 17th of 2018

Dear Indian Philosophy Bloggers I am currently in Mumbai. I have been invited to deliver the keynote talk for : The Center for Buddhist Studies Department of Philosophy, University of Mumbai International Conference On Buddhist Phenomenology, Culture and Society Between Continue reading The Center for Buddhist Studies Department of Philosophy, University of Mumbai Organizes an International Conference On Buddhist Phenomenology, Culture and Society Between February, 15th, 16th and 17th of 2018

Book Review of Roots of Yoga, Translated and Edited by James Mallinson and Mark Singleton (Reviewed by Neil Sims)

Roots of Yoga, translated and edited by James Mallinson and Mark Singleton, UK: Penguin Random House, 2017. 540 pp. $12.23 (paperback). Walk into most places dedicated to the teaching of yoga today, and you will likely see quotes from one Continue reading Book Review of Roots of Yoga, Translated and Edited by James Mallinson and Mark Singleton (Reviewed by Neil Sims)

First thoughts on omniscience in Indian thought

“Omniscience” (sārvajñya) assumes many different meanings in the various Indian philosophies. The understanding possibly most common in European and Anglo-American thought, which sees omniscience as including the knowledge of any possible thing in the past, present and future, is neither Continue reading First thoughts on omniscience in Indian thought

ibn Sīnā and Śāntideva on the incompleteness of the world

Cross-posted at Love of All Wisdom. I’ve been thinking lately about MacIntyre’s explanation of the Muslim philosopher ibn Sīnā and the ways in which ibn Sīnā’s concept of God requires us to rethink the entire world around us if we Continue reading ibn Sīnā and Śāntideva on the incompleteness of the world

A basic introduction to Viśiṣṭādvaita Vedānta_UPDATED

(I have been asked to write a short introduction to Viśiṣṭādvaita Vedānta and would like to test it on you, dear readers and fellow bloggers. Any comment or criticism would be more than welcome!) In its full-fledged form, the Viśiṣṭādvaita Continue reading A basic introduction to Viśiṣṭādvaita Vedānta_UPDATED

God and realism. Marginal notes on a workshop in Hawai’i, part 2

Can God as the perfect omniscient knower guarantee the possibility of a reality disidentified from all local perspectives and thus independent of them, though remaining inherently intelligible (by God Himself)? It depends on how one understands God. As discussed already Continue reading God and realism. Marginal notes on a workshop in Hawai’i, part 2

Omniscience and realism: Marginal notes about a workshop in Hawai’i

A non-intelligible entity cannot be conceived to exist. But, if the world needs to be known in order to exist, we need to postulate a non-partial perspective out of which it can be known. Since the perspectives of all human Continue reading Omniscience and realism: Marginal notes about a workshop in Hawai’i