Book Review of Roots of Yoga, Translated and Edited by James Mallinson and Mark Singleton (Reviewed by Neil Sims)

Roots of Yoga, translated and edited by James Mallinson and Mark Singleton, UK: Penguin Random House, 2017. 540 pp. $12.23 (paperback). Walk into most places dedicated to the teaching of yoga today, and you will likely see quotes from one Continue reading

Whose religion? Which science?

A little while ago I had the pleasure of giving a guest lecture on Buddhism to David Decosimo‘s class at the Boston University School of Theology. The students were a delight to teach – smart, actively engaged, asking many questions. Continue reading

God and the reality of the world (on Alex Watson’s contribution to a workshop in Hawai’i)

Do we need God to make sense of the world’s reality? Michael Dummett, who was surely not known for his religious fanatism came to this conclusion. God is, for this well-known philosopher, the objective perspective from which the world can Continue reading

NDPR review of The Collected Writings of Jaysankar Lal Shaw: Indian Analytic and Anglophone Philosophy

J. L. Shaw is an important figure in the contemporary movement to understand India’s śāstric traditions through analytic philosophy. Unfortunately (like other figures, including Kishor Chakrabarti), his influence is sometimes underappreciated given the preeminence of Matilal, Mohanty, Potter, and their followers. It is refreshing Continue reading

APA Newsletter on B. K. Matilal Now Available!

Regular blog readers may remember my earlier posts that I was co-editing, along with Prasanta Bandyopadhyay, the Fall 2017 edition of the APA Newsletter on Asian and Asian-American Philosophers and Philosophies.  The theme of the issue is “B. K. Matilal: The Continue reading

Pain and freedom in K.C. Bhattacharya: A question

A colleague from the Savitribai Phule Pune University, Prof. Muzaffar Ali, sent us this question concerning K.C. Bhattacharya. Can readers help? “To reflect on the feeling of pain is necessarily to wish to be free from it. To wish anything Continue reading

First thoughts on omniscience in Indian thought

“Omniscience” (sārvajñya) assumes many different meanings in the various Indian philosophies. The understanding possibly most common in European and Anglo-American thought, which sees omniscience as including the knowledge of any possible thing in the past, present and future, is neither Continue reading